South Street Seaport Museum and Pier 17

The South Street Seaport is home to a museum, as well as numerous attractions.
Location
South Street Seaport Museum
Fulton & South Streets, Pier 16
New York, NY 10038
Phone

(212) 748-8600

Hours

Wed.-Sun. 11am-5pm

Subway

2, 3, 4, 5, J, Z, or M to Fulton Street
A or C trains to Broadway-Nassau;
or E train towards Fulton Street.
Walk East on Fulton Street to Water Street.

South Street Seaport Museum

The South Street Seaport is right near Brooklyn, so you can visit it without breaking the flow of your trip.

The South Street Seaport is right near Brooklyn City, so you can visit it without breaking the flow of your trip.

Follow the bumpy cobblestone streets down to Pier 16 and you'll find the South Street Seaport Museum. This 30,000-square-foot maritime museum features exhibition galleries, a maritime library, a marine conservation lab, a working 19th-century print shop, and a craft center where wood carvers and model builders demonstrate their skills. Also featured on site is an outstanding collection of model ships, including full hull and waterline models. Perhaps more impressive is the South Street Seaport Museum's privately owned fleet of historic ships, the largest such fleet in the United States.

A visit to the South Street Seaport Museum is fun for the whole family. This kid-friendly NYC attraction promises to delight all those who are enchanted by the lore of the sea.

You can't miss the pier next to the ships, Pier 17 is filled with shops and restaurants of all sorts. Another view of the pier near the ships at the South Street Seaport. Be entertained at the South Street Seaport!

You can't miss the pier next to the ships, Pier 17 is filled with shops and restaurants of all sorts.

Restaurants near South Street Seaport Museum

Historical meets modern.  You can find the usual in dining right here at the South Street Seaport.

Historical meets modern. You can find the usual in dining right here at the South Street Seaport.

There are many good NYC restaurants close to South Street Seaport Museum NY. The food court at Pier 17 (currently closed for renovation) offers many inexpensive dining options, including Subway and Cajun Cafe, while the surrounding area offers many upscale alternatives, such as the following:

  • Acqua at Peck Slip: For outstanding Italian cuisine, including fresh seafood, look no further than Acqua at Peck Slip. This fine Italian restaurant stands just steps away from the South Street Seaport Museum and offers breathtaking views of the sea. Main courses typically range between $16 and $24.
  • You can see the Brooklyn Bridge from outside the Bridge Cafe.

    You can see the Brooklyn Bridge from outside the Bridge Cafe.

  • Bridge Cafe: Located at 279 Water Street, in a historic 1794 building once home to a brothel, Bridge Cafe is an upscale NY restaurant close to Brooklyn Bridge. Menu items range from $17 to $35 and include citrus poached day boat cod and grilled petite lamb chops.

More pictures of The South Street Seaport in New York

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Attractions near the South Street Seaport

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Hop On Hop Off & Liberty Pass


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Restaurants near the South Street Seaport

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Royal Way Limousine

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History of South Street Seaport

Even the cobblestone paths at the South Street Seaport have a part in the rich history in New York.

Even the cobblestone paths at the South Street Seaport have a part in the rich history in New York.

A National Historic District since 1978, the South Street Seaport comprises the largest concentration of restored early 19th-century commercial buildings in New York City. Renovated mercantile buildings, sailing ships, and former fish markets may all be found at the South Street Seaport NYC, along with modern tourist malls and upscale NYC restaurants.

The history of the South Street Seaport makes it a fun place for the whole family.

The history of the South Street Seaport makes it a fun place for the whole family.

The South Street Seaport began in the 1700s, when the Schermerhorns, a family of shipmasters and chandlers, purchased what is now known as the Seaport District, an area roughly bounded by Peck Slip, Water Street, John Street, and the East River. In 1810, Peter Schermerhorn built a series of conjoined buildings to house merchants of related trades. This structure, known as Schermerhorn Row, drew many patrons from the waterfront and downtown areas and was an unprecedented financial success.

Merchants, ship chandlers, sailmakers and figurehead carvers took their homes and businesses here in the 1800s.

Merchants, ship chandlers, sailmakers and figurehead carvers took their homes and businesses here in the 1800s.

As the center of shipping between 1815 and 1860, the Seaport was known by seafarers all over the globe. The bustling community that developed catered specifically to sailors' needs; merchants, ship chandlers, sailmakers, and figurehead carvers took up residence alongside boarding houses, saloons, and brothels. By 1880, cargo ships had grown dramatically in size and the industry grew out of South Street.

The 20th century, however, saw a decline in the Seaport. By the 1960s, having fallen into disrepair, the area was slated for demolition. But in 1967 a group of concerned citizens led by Peter and Norma Stanford obtained a charter creating the Seaport Museum. This group then purchased many of the dilapidated and uninhabited buildings and introduced a number of historic vessels to the area, thereby founding a maritime museum.

Throughtout the late 1970s, the Museum's trustees encouraged commercial developers to sublease shops on the ground floor. Partnering with the Rouse Company, the Museum began a $268 million project to restore and revitalize the Seaport. The project was a success, and the South Street Seaport is now fully gentrified.

Historic Ships at the South Street Seaport Museum

Next time you're in NYC, spend some time here and take home a bit of knowledge as a souvenir.

The South Street Seaport Museum NY boasts the largest privately maintained fleet of historic vessels in the United States. Among those vessels moored at the Museum pier are the Peking, 1911; the Wavertree, 1885; the Ambrose, 1908; and the Helen McAllister, 1900. Some of these historic vessels, such as the Peking, may be toured for a small fee.

Next time you're in NYC, spend some time here and take home a bit of knowledge as a souvenir.